USS Casimir Pulaski (SSBN-633)

The Story Of A Cold War Warrior

Welcome!

Welcome back in time to the decade of flares, huge sideburns, runaway chest hair and Italian love-horn necklaces.  Oh yeah, and submarine sailing as well.  The photos on this page were donated by various crewmembers and do not fit anywhere else on this site.  If you sent photos - as always, THANK YOU!!!!!  If not, feel free to share your memories with the world.  Enjoy your trip back in time.

Upper Level

The end of studies.  The passage from novice to professional.  No ceremony evokes greater emotion to the Silent Service than the awarding of the coveted Dolphins.  Here, Torpedoman Jack Postell and shipmates musters on the Starboard side of the Control Room to receive his "fish" (photo courtesy of the family of Jack Postell).

The proud sailor is then congratulated and presented with his certificate.  Some submarine commanding officers prefer a formal ceremony for the awarding of Dolphins but after working your butt off to earn them, it's hard for the person earning them to wait!  Present are TMCM Chappell, TM Don Ward, LTJG Schleeter, LT Jackson and the skipper, Charles Miller.  Thanks to James Williams for putting names to faces (photo courtesy of the family of Jack Postell).

Here's a shot of LTJG Schleeter occupying a seat in the navigation area of the Control Room.  Note the EAB connections on the bulkhead.  Thanks to James Williams for crewmember identification (photo courtesy of the family of Jack Postell).

Nuclear Reactor personnel gather for a photo in the Reactor Tunnel.  Assembled in the back row (left to right) are: Bradley "Red" Weber, unknown, Dan Jeffries, Rick Chester and unknown.  In the middle row is:  Harold Siercks, Rob Lowen, Larry Loomis, Marc Ehrichs, Larry Tobin, Ben McLaughlin and Fred Hildesheim.  Up front we have:  Rick Hons, Tom Thomas, Troy Magnuson, Duane Hatch, Brian Sebastian and Ron "Jake" Jakubisyn.  A big thank you to Larry Tobin for providing positive ID (photo courtesy of Jim Wynkoop).

This photo appears to have been taken in Maneuvering or somewhere back aft in engineering.  I think!  Anyone know for certain (photo courtesy of Walker Bousman)?

Middle Level

We start Middle Level up front in the Torpedo Room.  James Clifford poses for Jack Postell's camera between the torpedo tube hatches.  Note the placards noting that a warshot (live torpedo - as opposed to an exercise torpedo) is loaded in tube number 2.  Thanks to James Williams for crewmember identification (photo courtesy of the family of Jack Postell).

Here's the same view but with another sailor, this time MS3 Mark Boesh.  Note the various machinery and switches involved in the operation of the torpedo tubes.  Thanks to James Williams for crewmember identification (photo courtesy of the family of Jack Postell).

Here, FTB Doug Desousa rests his arm on one of Pulaski's torpedos.  Note the maze of pipes and fitting overhead and the standard Navy 24 hour clock.  Also note the yellow battle lanterns.  Thanks to James Williams for crewmember identification (photo courtesy of the family of Jack Postell).

Another view of the forward Torpedo area which includes LTJG Schleeter, Jack Postell, Don Ward, TM2 John Gordon and TM3 Harv Miller.  The torpedos appear to be the MK-37.  Thanks to James Williams and Don Ward for crewmember identification (photo courtesy of the family of Jack Postell).

Another close forward view showing test equipment and the cradles for the torpedos.  STS3 Glenn Pope, TM Don Ward, Jere Haus, Dave Becker and Bill Buzek are some of the crew present.  Thanks to James Williams and Don Ward for the crew identification information (photo courtesy of the family of Jack Postell).

Here's a clean shot of both torpedos on their racks, stowed for sea.  Note the large yellow crane in the center of the room for assisting in the movement of the weapons within the room (photo courtesy of the family of Jack Postell).

MM3 Jeff Beck between the torpedo tubes.  Note that the torpedo tubes have tags on them to note the load status: whether they are empty or not.  Thanks to Don Ward for crewmember identification (photo courtesy of the family of Jack Postell).

Here's a view from forward looking aft.  The STS3 Glenn Pope is sitting on top of the Port side reload.  Note the exposed nose of the torpedo showing the weapon's seeker.  Thanks to James Williams for crewmember identification (photo courtesy of the family of Jack Postell).

Same torpedo - different crewman, this time Jeff Calhoun.  Thanks to James Williams for crewmember identification (photo courtesy of the family of Jack Postell).

LTJG Schleeter in the center of the room this time.  Note the open hatch to his left which is for a storage room.  Note the design of the strap to secure the torpedo from movement.  Thanks to James Williams for crewmember identification (photo courtesy of the family of Jack Postell).

Here's IC2 Rory Sneider close to the overhead ("ceiling") of the Torpedo Room up near the winch and assorted piping.  This view appears to have been taken from the front looking aft.  Thanks to James Williams for crewmember identification (photo courtesy of the family of Jack Postell).

Here's a photo entitled "Desalvo and Durand" which was taken in the Torpedo Room near the watertight hatch.  The photo features FTG "Cat" Desalvo and MMSN Don Durand.  Thanks to James Williams for crewmember identification (photo courtesy of Don Durand).

TM Jack Postell, TM Don Ward, MS3 Peter Alphin and STS3 Glenn Pope appear in this shot, staged near the Torpedo Room watertight hatch.  MS3 Peter Alphin is sporting what appears to be a black eye earned during the "Battle For Faslane" (see the Sea Stories page for more details...).  Note the torpedo's propellor.  Thanks to James Williams for crewmember identifcation (photo courtesy of the family of Jack Postell).

The opposite side of the same area.  The orange unit on the torpedo's rear appears to be a protective cover of some sort.  Note the communications gear behind his right shoulder for communicating with the Bridge and Control Room.  Anyone know who the sailor is (photo courtesy of the family of Jack Postell)?

Here's a shot of Brian Sebastian on the rearward Port side of the Torpedo Room.  Thanks to Larry Tobin for providing ID information (photo courtesy of the family of Jack Postell).

Here's STS3 Glenn Pope in the same area but opposite side.  Note the ladder for the escape hatch.  Thanks to James Williams for crewmember identifcation (photo courtesy of the family of Jack Postell).

Here, Chief Ron "Jake" Jakubisyn enters the room through the watertight door.  Note the old style submarine fleet ballcap.  A big thanks to Larry Tobin for providing picture ID information (photo courtesy of the family of Jack Postell).

Same view - different Chief!  This time it's MMCS Ken Marceau.  The gear boxes behind him are sonar gear.  Thanks to James Williams for crewmember identification (photo courtesy of the family of Jack Postell).

Rob Bell is another of my great sources of information and photos and has submitted these shots of Patrol 48 which was a Christmas Patrol during 1978.  Thanks Rob!  Here's the Mess Decks "rigged for Santa" (photo courtesy of Rob Bell).

I was fortunate to have never made a Christmas Patrol.  The strain on families is difficult and emotional.  Here, the Mess Attendents serve Christmas dinner (photo courtesy of Rob Bell).

Here is a nice festive shot of the crew enjoying their Christmas dinner.  Is the sailor on the left wearing a medical eye patch or merely some form of costume for the occasion (photo courtesy of Rob Bell)?

This next photo was taken in the Middle Level of the Missile Compartment and shows one of our large photo and information contributor's, Mike Brand.  This view is of Port Side Berthing (photo courtesy of Mike Brand).

Views Of Scotland

A picturesque country road leading from or towards Holy Loch?  Anybody's guess.  This road would have been travelled heavily by off-duty crew out for some relaxation (photo courtesy of Walker Bousman).

Here's a glimpse of the tender and a good view of the valley that the Naval Submarine Base sat in (photo courtesy of Walker Bousman).

No photo of the British Isles would be complete without a shot of a double decker bus.  Note also the weather conditions (probably verrrrry cold!)(photo courtesy of Walker Bousman).

Not sure where in Holy Loch this was taken but it looks like a nice place for some barbeque and beer drinking (photo courtesy of Walker Bousman).

Refit

This view of the Pulaski was taken from the tender and shows to good effect, the shore power cables hanging over from the tender.  Notice the white covers over the main ballast tank vents (photo courtesy of Don Durand).

A good shot of the Pulaski inside Holy Loch's floating dry dock (photo courtesy of Don Durand).

Another dry dock view, this time of Pulaski's snout and the well-worn markings on her.  The scaffolding was erected at the bottom of the dry dock to facilitate maintenance, repainting, etc. (photo courtesy of the family of Jack Postell).

The tempo of repairs and maintenance never ends.  Here, under the watchful eyes of several "khaki's" a repair commences onboard the deck.  Present are FTBC Paulison, ICCS Thier, MMCS Marceau and TM1 John Gordon.  Anyone know the guy actually doing the work?  Thanks to James Williams for crewmember identification (photo courtesy of the family of Jack Postell).

Another dry dock view.  Note the safety lines on the fairwater planes.  Also note the white fence at the rear which is the dry dock's rear gate.  Notice also the safety netting on the side of the sub.  You can also see Pulaski's flag staff running down the center of the sail's rear area (photo courtesy of the family of Jack Postell).

Here's a photo of Chief Warner sometime during a very chilly Patrol 48 in Norfolk, Virginia (photo courtesy of Rob Bell).

This next photo is without a doubt, the most famous (or "infamous") of all Pulaski photographs rivalled only by the 1980's "threesome" photo.  It's funny, but 99% of 1970's crewmembers who write me and say "I have a photo to send you" it is ALWAYS this photograph!  There really is no explanation needed nor will I attempt any.  I'll credit the source of the photo to Rob Bell as he was the first 1970's crewmember to send me this photo, but the photographer of this sacred Pulaski event was none other than Don Ward who has graciously provided me the names of the happy mooners.  Should I print their names for posterity - or should that be "posterior-ity?" (photo courtesy of Rob Bell).

 

On Patrol

Here's a view of the crew sometime during Patrol 48 enjoying a swim call.  Diving off of the turtle back is the shortest route to the water.  (photo courtesy of Rob Bell).

And there are always, there is the ever present, rifle-armed shark watch, in this case, TM3 James "Duane" Roberts (photo courtesy of Rob Bell).

Here's another view of the shark watch.  They appear to be doing some sort of watchstanding turn over.  The watchstander is wearing the standard submarine safety harness.  Note the windows in the front of the sail.  These are for when the weather is too rough to be up in the bridge.  The bridge watch will merely close the upper hatch, and stay in that space (photo courtesy of Rob Bell).